Community-Supported Agriculture (CSA) is a mutually beneficial partnership in which urban consumers receive fresh, organic vegetables while sustaining the livelihoods and stewardship of regional farmers. In a CSA, the farmer pre-sells shares; the money goes to the cost of growing, distributing, and paying the farmer a living wage.

Members of the CSA at Ansche Chesed have the option of purchasing vegetable, fruit, egg and fresh flower shares from Garden of Eve -- a certified organic farm on the east end of Long Island.  To further education and awareness of food issues, we also organize events and workshops for members throughout the season. 

Garden of Eve has been partnering with Ansche Chesed for over 10 years to distribute local produce and build community in the Upper West Side. We were Garden of Eve’s first CSA and the very first Hazon-sponsored CSA in the country! 
 


and to look at our farmer's site to get info about the farm.


Share List:
July 26, 2017
Pl
ease note that due to fluctuations at the farm our list is not always accurate.

Vegetable Share: (Greens Care/Tips)
Sweet Corn
New Potatoes
Garlic
Zucchini
Arugula (please excuse any small yellowed leaves that were grabbed when it was cut - just pick them out and the rest will be fine. That's just how it grows)
Lettuce
Cucumbers
Fennel
Cabbage
 
Fruit Share:
Cherries
Peaches

Egg Share:
Half-Dozen

Flower Share: (Flower Care Tips)
Sunflowers

Check out our Recipe of the Week page!


Helpful Tips:
  • Swap Box:  If there is a vegetable or fruit you just don't want - drop it in the swap box and take something out you would rather have.  Do NOT take an extra share of something from the tables!
  • Pick up hours are 5:30 - 7:30 PM at Ansche Chesed.  Please do not come early unless you are a volunteer.  We need the time to set up signs and supplies.  Thank you for your understanding.
  • Don't forget to bring BAGS! We at CSA Ansche Chesed love our planet, and know you do too.


Follow us on Twitter to be kept in the loop on CSA Ansche Chesed updates, tips, and last minute bonuses!


Veggie Tip: Garlic Scapes

Although garlic plants do not flower, they do produce flower stalks. On hardneck garlic, the stalks are known as garlic scapes and they are surprisingly tasty and versatile to use in the kitchen.

Garlic scapes start to form a month or so after the first leaves. They start off growing somewhat straight and then start curving in circles. Most gardeners cut the scapes off of their garlic plants, since leaving them on only diverts the plant's strength and energy away from forming a plump bulb.

If you harvest your scapes young and tender, you can chop them into salads or use them as a topping, as you would use scallions. More mature scapes can be sauteed lightly and used over pasta, with eggs, mixed with cooking greens, pickled or pretty much in any dish that would be complemented by garlic. My favorite way to use them is to make a garlic scape pesto. Or you could try our ​​white bean and garlic scapes dip.


Latest News from the Farm

Sweet Corn is here! We hope you enjoy it because it is very difficult to grow organically, we are one of the only organic CSAs to give their members sweet corn, as far as we know. We want to help you understand about the worms that you will find in some of the corn. 


Organic sweet corn is hard to grow because of heavy pest pressure from corn earworms in New York State. That is just a fact of life of organic production, as contrasted with conventional farmers who are spraying highly toxic chemicals on their corn every three days or so. We have heard stories of members not taking our organic corn at the CSA distributions because they are afraid of a few small worms – this makes us sad. We work very hard to bring you super sweet corn for you to enjoy, it is a highlight of our season and we hope it is a highlight of yours. 


We wish we could cull through every ear at the farm, but this would mean that we wouldn’t have time to harvest all the crops that we want to send you in your share! If you get corn with a worm or other imperfection, just snap off any affected tips, the rest of the ear is not affected. If the tip of the corn or a strip along the side doesn’t have kernels and instead is just white, that just means that it was not pollinated, not that it was bad. At times, some very small ones get harvested and distributed – we try to take these home and eat them ourselves… but even if it’s just a few mouthfuls, it’s pretty good. 


Please know we don’t ever intend for you to receive anything damaged obviously, we spend hundreds of man-hours each week going through the produce, culling, and packaging it so it arrives at your CSA in good shape. However, sometimes our best efforts are thwarted. For example if you get a container of cherry tomatoes with one smushy one in it, same with fruit etc, just wash it out at home and discard anything broken, the good ones will still be fine.

 

Potatoes are in! While the rain helps grow our plants, it makes it harder to dig potatoes, in the wet muddy soil. But these were pitchforked out by hand, to get them to you for this week’s share. Everyone loves new potatoes, the skin is very thin so you don’t even have to peel them, just scrub lightly under running water and then cook. 


The extreme humidity over the past week or two also helps out all the fungal diseases that are tough on organic growers, since we don’t use the toxic fungicides that are a staple for conventional growers’ arsenal. Once fungus starts to grow on the leaves, the leaves start to die, and the plant won’t produce any more. Conventional growers are out in the field spraying every 3-4 days, for most crops: tomatoes, corn, potatoes, zucchini, cucumbers, etc. We have a few oil-based sprays but nothing that works that well… so we hope for dryer weather and plant additional “successions” so new plants will start producing when the old are finished.


Like Garden of Eve on Facebook!


Visit Our Recipes Archive for Cooking, Storage Tips, 
and Recipes here!

Read this blog entry about cooking with CSA vegetables. 
Very instructive with good recipe links!

And read www.farmincityfolk.com - a blog written by CSA Ansche Chesed member Maggie Tauranac about how she and her partner support farms in the city and what they cook with their CSA!


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